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, a colorado sheriff explains why he won't enforce his' tough new you gun control law. and breakthrough artist of the year rock the house with the governor. ♪ >>> ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. [ applause ] >> mike: thank you. thank you very much. a great lively audience and a fantastic show lined up for you. welcome to huckabee from the fox news studios in new york city. who would have thought that just over four months after liberals were dancing in the streets over president obama's reelection they are now crying in their beer and some don't even drink beer but they started. because they are are now realizeing that their taxes have gone up. way up in some cases. and obama care which was supposed to save them $2,500 a year is busting their budgets as the cost of their healthcare is soaring. ultraliberal comedian bill maher must have met with his accountant and gotten his tax bill. here is what he said. >> rich people i'm sure you would agree with this actually do pay the freight in the country. something like 70%. and here in california i just want to say liberals you could
. they are important and enforceable law but we need them to do it in a way that is fair and we need to find out how to hold them accountable because a lot of their actions can and do produce in justices in the system. >> host: professor davis is the power institutionalized and tell all or just developed over the years? >> guest: the system of public prosecutions started right around the time of the democracy when we had this view that we wanted to vote for people and hold them accountable the people choose the individuals to perform these functions, and so when we start to get this prosecution because in the past there used to be practices, individuals, private individuals are able to bring charges against other individuals and they have to pay for it. that didn't last very long and then there was the prosecution system for the state and local system, so all of our states except for about four of them had elected officials for the state. federal prosecutors are appointed but state and local our elective officials and that ev process is supposed to be the way that we the people hold prosecutors acco
] >>> laws designed to combat voter fraud are popular with one particular demographic, the one that lost the white house in november. today, those forces are arguing before the supreme court that an arizona voter fraud law is so important its stringent documentation requirements so necessary that we should forget that federal law trumps state law. indeed. to understand, just how popular these laws are with conservatives, watch how the crowd at cpac responded to south carolina governor nikki haley when she mentioned her own state's voter fraud law. >> every election in our state now requires photo i.d. before you vote. >> joining us now is democratic congressman elijah cummings of maryland. welcome, sir. >> it's good to be with you. >> what is your response, sir, to hearing the crowds cheer like that for voter i.d. laws? because that line about voter fraud got a bigger response even than her line trashing the affordable care act. >> first of all, martin, i believe that voting is a right. and it's something that is afforded to all of our citizens and we should not be doing anything to prev
to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must have a seat at the table. no. 2. community-based organizati
the state passes jessica's law. and bill, why are you afraid to confront new york governor andrew cuomo on jessica's law? >> a number of hard hitting reports on the governor. we now believe that like governor christie in new jersey he will sign jessica's law if it gets to his desk and we're working on that. not easy in new york. new jersey we did it and now we're coming here. william, liverpool, england. bill, this year i did not drink on st. patrick's day instead donated 50 pounds to charity. well, a tip of the hot to you, william. thanks for taking my tip of the day. bill from california i was disgusted by jesse watters showing teenagers inebriated at st. patrick's day. and arc gnaw, brit hume looked hot last night in his sweater. so let me get this straight, kay, you are saying that mr. hume looked hot, as in smoking? that's got to make his week. i don't think he ever heard that before. and finally tonight the factor tip of the day, had to read a lot of fiction because so much real stuff to digest, i have more homework than most kids. and it's a very exciting book, much better
your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. [ male announcer ] book ahead and save up to 20 percent at doubletree.com, so you can sit back, relax and enjoy. doubletree by hilton. where the little things mean everything. accomplishing even little things can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms s
. currently, it is against the law to purchase a gun if you are a criminal or have a dangerous record but not all require background checks. democrats are trying to put forward a bill that requires universal background checks. that has been the top priority for president obama. this bill will not include the assault weapons ban, which would ban certain types of high- capacity assault rifles and other weapons. there was not enough support in the senate to feel like that was possible to include and be able to pass the floor in the senate. it is a bit of a blow to the president agenda. host: here is the headline in the "washington post" -- how significant is it that the lead democrats and the senate is coming up with something and is going to move forward? it is significant that it is harry reid. prided himself on the support he received from the nra. he was able to use the support of gun rights groups to defeat in aepublican opponents difficult race. he has been reluctant to support gun control throughout the years. since the newtown shooting, he has been largely silent on the issue. it
and advocates are warningave major cultural shift if marriage equality becomes part of the law of the land. >> i wish it were just about the marriage altar. it is about much more. it's about altering all of society, with marriage goes what our children for taught, parents losing the right to define the morals for their children. it's about religious freedom. they are intertwined in our culture. it's about the right to conduct yours business as you see fit. >> support for same-sex marriage has groab, but it's favored by less than half, 49% of registered voters. one of the attorneys arguing for marriage equality this week says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be firew
that the job market out there. be the even more fearful than during the recession, which is the law. they're even less like a quit even though we should've expected a big increase in the recovery started. the more reason you can get that water level up even though you're adding a slaughter is because the number of jobs in terms of points is even lower than normal. one measure of how hard it is is to get the number of hires each month compared to the number of people unemployed and looking as well as the number of people who lived given up looking for work. you can see how the ratio has gone up and pretty much been stuck since 2009. we haven't really seen the number of jobs out there matching the number of people who are looking for work. and that gives you some idea of why this quit rate has not gone up, white state so though. people have said good idea of how hard it is to go and find a job. there's two groups of people being hurt the most. people at 55 and they basically lose their jobs there's a lot of trouble trying to find it and also very young people who are in train the job market
stricter gun control laws in a lot of places, in western states that are supposedly so libertarian and free-wheeling. i think it's going to be a long haul. i'm glad we have a billionaire on this issue. >> did you notice colorado what it did last week? a gun state, a hunting state. once reliably red. a transformational change. >> i think colorado is a good example. i grew up in that state, it definitely is a hunting-friendly state. i only lived in sweet states, strategic. >> there's some ohio blood in there? >> i'm going to move there for a while so i can say, i used to live in ohio, it's a swing state. you're seeing it in colorado where this is going. states are responsive on a local level. politics is all about pressure and leverage. for somebody like a mary landrieu, she doesn't see as a national poll as necessarily the pressure that's going to change her election. she's worried about louisiana. she's worried about getting re-elected in that state. and until you see the zeitgeist change within the state, these politicians are not responsive to that. where bloomberg can make a huge differe
vote. supporters say law would keep illegal immigrants from casting ballots. the critics claim the real goal here is to keep minorities away from the polls. today the justices heard arguments from both sides. and the new york city mayor michael bloomberg is not backing down after the judge struck down his ban on large sugary sodas. in fact, the mayor has already outlawed smoking in bars and restaurants and now he he is going after tobacco again. how this time? you'll see for a while. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's
. that is under current law, the law the president supports. he changed to make that, so it is financially feasible. our program would move us in the direction of premium support, which is what members of congress have. it will allow for a certain amount of money subsidy, a benefit check, if you will, for seniors to be able to utilize that to purchase what they want for themselves so they are able to have an insurance program that is much more responsive to them. as a physician, medicare patients are having a whale of a time finding doctors to take medicare. if you are a new medicare patients and your doctor prior to the agencies the five does not take medicare patients, you have a very difficult time finding a new dr. who will take a new medicare patient. one out of every three doctors in this country have limited the number of patients they are seeing. see no of every eight medicare patients at all. the program is flawed and needs to be reformed. we need to strengthen medicare. our guest,rice is republican of georgia. we are talking about budgetary matters. the numbers are on the screen.
and though many key parts of the health care law don't go into effect until next year, many americans are already feeling the impact of the changes to the nation's health care system. let's check in now with a checkup on obama care. >> reporter: dueling opinions in washington today on the impact of obama care and whether it's been a boon or a boondoggle to americans and american businesses. obama says it protects americans from insurance companies and says the slaw saving people money. the president said in a statement, millions of americans are saving $600 a year on prescription drugs. millions of young people have beenable to stay on their family's health plan to age 26. preventive care, like mammograms for women and wellness visits for seen, i don't covered free of charge. most importantly, for the sake of our fiscal future, the growth of health care costs is beginning to slow. but the democratic-controlled senate voted early this week to repeal part of obama care, passed with bipartisan support. they repealed a tax on medical devices that would have increased the costs we all pay
the law. they approved a bill for everyone last month. it's up for a vote in the senate in april. right now people are lining up outside the supreme court trying to get front row seats to history. the court tackles same-sex marriage in less than two days. justices will hear arguments for the first case on tuesday involving california's proposition 8, the ban on same-sex marriage. the second strs on the defense of marriage act which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. cnn.com has been covering this very extensively. john, you recently followed some gay couples. i looked at some videos you had this morning, trying to get married in mississippi, a state that bans same-sex marriage. here's a clip of that. >> this application is a record, and it is a permanent record. but we're showing it's denied. >> i can't imagine what it might be like to be in your position, to have to tell people who clearly have a home together, share things and love each other -- >> i appreciate you all -- >> that's part of a story on cnn.com by john sutter. also with us is ryan anderson of the heritage fou
is a highly regarded securities lawyer, a professor at the university of san diego law school, and an expert on sarbanes-oxley. >> the idea was to have a criminal statute in place that would make ceos and cfos think twice, think three times, before they signed their names attesting to the accuracy of financial statements or the viability of internal controls. >> and this law has not been used at all in the financial crisis? >> it hasn't been used to go after wall street. it hasn't been used for these kinds of cases at all. >> why not? >> i don't know. i don't have a good answer to that question. i hope that it will be used. i think there clearly are instances where ceos and cfos signed financial statements that said there were adequate controls, and there weren't adequate controls. but i can't explain why it hasn't been used yet. >> we told partnoy about eileen foster's allegations of widespread mortgage fraud at countrywide and efforts to prevent the information from reaching her, the federal government, and the board of directors--in violation of the company's internal controls. i mean, th
challenges for law enforcement as they have no profile and their experiences and motives are also -- are often distinct. for a moment, i would like to discuss the cyber threat, which has evolved over the past decade. cyber criminals have become increasingly adept at exploiting weaknesses in our networks, and once inside, they can infiltrate government and military information, as well as our valuable and -- intellectual property. organized criminal act cyber send the kids and in deal -- ideologically driven activist groups. willieve the cyber threat be cool or eclipse the terrorist threat in the future. we are enhancing our capabilities. we have focused our cyber division on addressing computer intrusions and network attacks. each of our offices have become cyber task forces. we're cloud there -- collaborating and sharing with our federal partners more than ever in the context of a national cyber joint task force, which has 19 military, law- enforcement agencies working together to stop current attacks and prevent them in the future. we also recognize that the private sector is th
where this evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be
and law enforcement can work together on measures that will ensure that certain operators are being a bit more responsible because that creates an issue for everyone else and i think that is where i hope that we go. >> anything else? and by the way, i think who knew that three harvard law grads would be so interested in this issue. i think that is president chiu noted that. >> is there any, anything else that chief? >> no, i think that complete agreement here. we all want to see the city prosper, and the clubs do well, and do the safely and responsibly. >> i think that we are working towards that goal and working closely with the entertainment in doing it. >> why don't we open it up to public comment. any member who would like to speak, please come forward. >> hello, i am stephanie grain berg and i am here representing the cpab as well as the neighbors which is a neighborhood association (inaudible) ininclusive of the troubled long troubled broad way corridor. first of all, thank you for having this hearing, i think that it is very, very important. i am here really to request or plead, if
choosing boe tech, an east coast consulting firm to help implement the new law legal rising marijuana for the purpose of getting stoned. >> we look forward to working with the board to address the unprecedented challenge of organizing a taxed and regulated market in way that is plekt public health and public safety. >> why did boe tech win? >> they were the highest individual scores in each of the four categories. >> some have called the position the state's drug czar. >> i don't believe that's our official title. >> the competition for the contract was fierce. >> we ended up getting a ton of responses, actually 112 submissions received by the agency, and 95 of those were actual proposals. out of that we had 43 proposals deemed non-responsive. >> wonder why. the pot head consultant bo tech's ceo mark kleinman is already controversial among activists because he expressed concern about state legalization efforts conflicting with federal law. >> we have no idea what the federal government is going to do. if they step in with an injunction, we won't implement based on the dates in 502, bu
husband john quincy adams and the complex relationship with her mother-in-law, abigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by facebook and twitter tonight. >> the republican party released a plan this morning for its approach to the next presidential election that deals with attracting minority and women voters. announced this. these comments are just under one hour. >> i appreciate that introduction. thank you for the introduction of in welcoming us to the press club. i know most of you came for eggs and coffee but thank you for staying for the speech. i want to recognize our co- chair sharon day and are treasurer tony day. day. our treasurer tony all, i you and most of want to think and how grateful i am to this opportunity project. their work cut brings us here today. i want to introduce them this morning. henry barbara of mississippi, glenn mccall of south carolina, former whitew, and house press secretary ari fleischer. when republicans lost in november, it was a wake-up call. in response, i initiated the most public and most, free handson if post election rev
member should do. of course, we have regulations to vote, to discuss laws and permits. we have a budget to control and in that budget, you will see our mobility policy. you can have your own expenses on infrastructure work, for instance, but in brussels, we also have an important policy on financing groups, social groups who are working on the issue. and i believe we should never forget to work on equity because we have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has h
with those individuals. we abide by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit do
, it was a law professor and a community organizer. and i think he was probably a liberal from the jump. and ted cruise comes out of a different political atmosphere. texas is very different from chicago he has the experience and the background of a guy who made it from scratch in the state of texas, which is -- you know low tax opportunity state. and you see the effect it's had on these two men, not that they wouldn't have those convictions anyway you can see it. >> bill: the nation is going to have to decide i think in the next four years what kind of country they want. because this is not going to be able to compromised. it's too big. brit hume, everybody, living large down there in miami. if you need any help, brit, call us tonight and we will help you out. directly ahead, a grizzly murder in colorado. will the woman beat the rap? there she is. big beef tonight. those reports after these messages. what's droid-smart ? with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by moto
through the ordinance language. not once does it mention pass through. these are laws which are currently on the books and we believe the process works in our significant meetings we've had with tenant communities and with the ram port, we know there are hardship applications available for disabled and senior citizens and people who can not afford a resident increase in this nature. i know they are one of five organizations that receive funding from san francisco to help people with this process. with a we would like to do and i would like to give credit to supervisors breed for the amendment in the ordinance that there is now amendment for community outreach. this is a broad base piece of legislation which is in a 30 year plan, but to put it in this ordinance is something we need to do with significant outreach to the community, to the existing city departments that are going to be plan checking this, but to really make sure that if someone can't afford to pay for this, there are avenues that someone can take and i'm happy to have you come up to discuss the detail hardship of this proces
. >> and at least in spring through june. >> so we will actually have to adopt the change of the bi laws and we can call the meetings every month. >> i would rather keep it special meetings for may, april and, may, i think that once we get through, this, through the budget, i think that meeting at 9:30 will be appropriate. >> i don't want to go through changing the by laws. >> okay. >> that would be my preference >> thank you so much. the staff, and thank you so much to board members and if there are no further announcements are discussions the meeting is adjourned. >> -- to track stolen phones to be used in the field for other investigative purposes. that is approximately 977 dollars. >> you have a memo from the captain in your packets regarding this do nation. ironically to track cell phone thefts. is there anything you'd like to add? commissioners, questions or concerns? and is there any public comment regarding this matter. >> [inaudible] for quite a few times starting when he was the secretary for the police commission. i have a great deal of respect for him. i believe his promotion was w
, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of system can accomplish that public safety health objective
counsels that i talked about in liberated areas, to develop their police forces because law and order as you heard in turkey, is a big issue. and so we need working with partners, i think the germans are going to help us with this. >> excuse me, ambassador, i only have a minute left. could you just answer my question? >> on the question about assad, there's two possibilities. we see him pulling forces in. will he hold out in damascus at the end? maybe. but a lot of observers think he might instead retreat to the heartland of the base of his support which would be up along the coast in northwest syria. we're not quite sure which he would do. >> let me reclaim my time. i'm sorry, mr. ambassador. the opposition, when mr. weber was asking you questions. the leading opposition movement, is that an al qaeda affiliate? that an al qaeda affiliate? >> no, absolutely is not. the al qaeda affiliate is a small part of the opposition. it is a small minority. the voice is getting louder. >> is this hassan hito the new prime minister, what is his affiliation with the muslim brotherhood? we heard rep
in the bail reform act of 1984, the federal law, the birth of preventative detention which one thought was clearly unconstitutional and then became a public good that changed the whole view of a system. now we live in a justice preemptive justice, but they will commit other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you have arraignment f
the top union protests. in michigan, they're mad about a right to work law that starts next week. and in washington, they're mad about all of the automatic spending cuts they say will get worse every week. but with right to work states adding more jobs and with many in the government looking to cut more spending, is it time tore unions to simply get with the program? charles payne, dagen mcdowell, adam lashinsky, charlie gas pregas-- gasperino. >> and with the. >> i love the big raps. >> and communities with fewer presence of unions are doing better communities and businesses. the they drove hostess out of business and they have to figure out the dynamics. they've got to take a step back, we're trying to benefit and not in it for ourselves and the message doesn't get across anymore. >> neil: dagen? >> this is evidence of unions on the run. if you look at michigan, a huge move that that state, kind of the birth of unions as we know it in this country, is now a right to work state, but what you see -- you're starting to see the down and dirty tactics. a lot of unions in that state
outcomes then it's the policy. >> paul: and perez was housing housing law to prosecute banks with this theory. >> that's right. >> paul: and he thought this might be illegal, why? because the disparate is used in some parts, but not in housing. >> it's employment. but they don't have the same language as title vii law and he was afraid at that st. paul would win this case. by the way, st. paul itself said it thought it would win, but dropping the case because it it didn't want to endanger important anti-discrimination work that the justice department was doing. so think about that, you have a senior member of the justice department leaning on other parts of government to withdraw a case, deny the supreme court the ability to rule on this disparate practice under the fair housing act and in the meantime, having the government in the join two cases that could have brought tens of millions of dollars to taxpayers. >> paul: can you believe any case like this, jason, where the official basically got somebody to drop a case the supreme court had already accepted? >> no, no, i can't
movement. a year later, a couple in minnesota was denied a marriage license because state law limited marriage to persons of the opposite sex. their case made to the u.s. supreme court back in 1972. it was dismissed without so much as a written opinion. the court ruled that same sex couples have no constitutional rights married and that the legal challenge itself failed to raise a substantial federal question at all. but the struggle continued. it would be another 14 years before the supreme court would issue a major ruling on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers,
. with today's announcement, this stop is now protected by law. so generations of americans can remember those struggles and those sacrifices. we need to remember the past so we can address the problems of the president. a program is put in place to help the legacy of slavery. this comes week after the law designated to protect minority rights in some places with an ugly history. today we also learned that a democratic governor in arkansas had to veto republican voter i.d. bill to become a state law. these are serious cases and serious issues. issues born from our past. the great southern writer willi william faulkner wrote he, the past is not dead. it's not even past. we must not forget the struggles that continue today. and we must muster courage, imagine the courage it took for tubman to keep going back in the south, possibly being captured or killed. we don't need that much courage, just some of that courage. we'll face the deals that are trying to be cut to turn the clock back on progress in america. we all need to have a little tubman in us. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardbal
bash for obamacare. law turning three years old today. left couldn't be happier. >> it helps us of honor of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness >> eric: a gift now standing 6'7" taller than the president. cashin' in, crashing the party right now. >> eric: i'm eric boling and "cashin' in" crew is with us this. we and welcome everybody. don't crack the bubbly just yet. it's been three years since president obama signed obamacare into law. regulations keep growing and growing. is it starting to get messy. republicans declaring messy that is one of architects saying it himself. >> i think we know it is going to be messy. there will be things that come up that are unanticipated. >> eric: he is right. when we bought the cake. woman said obamacare that is why my hours got cut. i guess we can expect more of that? >> you are going to see a lot more of that. this is direct impact that it is having. we had the legislation and people are trying to read it and get through it. now you see the regulations piling up a and practical day to day coming out in the form of a woman who is trying t
people witnessed the crime and did not step in. ohio has a law that if you witness a crime you must report it. there are many more that need to be charged for this. >> michael: lou shapiro when you hear that, ohio does have this law. it's a felony not to report a crime. it's seldom invoked. i went to school with an honor system. if you saw someone cheat you're as culpable as the cheater. >> the general public is not always expected to know what is a crime and what is not a crime. when someone is faced with a question, did you see the person may say, i didn't see it that way or it didn't hit me that way that's why it's not typically invoked. >> michael: as a defense attorney now. let's say--i'm going to give a hypothetical. these two kids were convicted. you're representing one of the people who are under surveillance by these grand juries under possible indictment. what do you say to the grand jury? what do you have your clients say here? at this point this case has been adjudicated. >> i would advise my client to play it as close to the vest as possible. if he hold out long enough
politics and fun but as the president, his job, the law requires him, to submit a budget by the first monday in february. four of the first five years of his presidency he's failed and this is the first time since the law went into effect congress was forced to kick off the budget process because the white house -- >> the president's people would say it's -- they're hammering over the budget, sequestration. that's what prompted this. it's not all his fault. >> first of all he missed three of the previous four. >> neil: other presidents have missed. >> but his number of misses. >> neil: higher than theirs? >> if we're talking about shooting percentage, he's hitting 1-5. >> neil: what's in it for him being late? >> he sees what's in it for me or what do i suffer by not doing it on lets let the house do their plan. the senate will put out their plan which never balances. i'll say nice things and eventually put out my plan which isn't going to go anywhere but you can't ignore the law. if you're a conservative and sports fan you shouldn't be man that the president is having fun doing his b
of what happened nobody has any idea what motivated this murder. law enforcement said they're not jumping to conclusions whether his job or his job as second in command of state prisons in missouri before he came to colorado, whether any of those job titles had anything to do with his murder last night. they said they're keeping an open mind as to the possibility that what he does for a living had nothing to do with why he was killed. but in response to the killing, at what is already a heightened time of political tension in the state, colorado officials have responded by increasing security for other top government officials in the state. they have also increased security at the governor's mansion. this is happening in colorado at an already heightened time. the colorado legislature has been debating and passing gun reform legislation and that debate has been unusually contentious. they have pledged on the floor of the senate that they will disobey them. they will disobey the state's new laws. democratic lawmakers have received threats for their support of gun reform. criminal charges h
. eight shotgun shells expand background checks the background check fee, and the laws will go into affect on july 1st. it happened in the state of colorado where today they woke up the department of corrections was asass fated. he's friend of governor john hickenlooper. john hickenlooper said he signed this ban on high capacity weapons because it's a sticking point on the gun control debate. >> i think this ban on high capacity magazines is of that same ilk. it allows us to con tim contemplate someone who is bent on destruction just the seconds that it allows others to escape. >> michael: coloradoans were able to do what the united states senate was unable to do. dianne feinstein's ban did not pass on the floor vote because harry reid decided they were not going it to put it in their gun bill that they're going to put on the floor. it's an assaults weapons ban. over 200 weapons are still available to americans. but no, this was not good enough. the reason was because reid and other democratic senators were afraid of how it would play. max baucus of montana jon tester of montana. mark begi
the governor of colorado signed an important gun safety bill into law, a series of bills into law. the new laws limit ammunition magazines and requires universal background checks to be paid for by gun customers themselves. they followed new york who just over a month ago became the state with the toughest gun laws in the country. outlawing magazines with more than seven rounds and gun safety is a national problem but the states are leading the way. none more than the state of new york. joining me now is the man who played the pivotal role in getting those laws passed, new york state attorney general eric schneiderman. mr. attorney general, welcome back to the show. you had a top law enforcement official in one of the biggest states in the country. tell us how you managed to get things done what congress so far has not been able to do. >> i think we ought to give credit to my colleagues in government and really on a bipartisan basis in new york, i think people seized the political moment. it was a galvanizing force and the bill that the governor and senate and assembly passed and i'm now defend
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